Now Reading
Sustainable Newcomer Labels That Are About to Become Big?

Sustainable Newcomer Labels That Are About to Become Big?

More and more small clothing brands become part of the sustainable fashion movement. We want to support them all but here are just some of them we love. So let’s cheer them on and shop them instead of the big players. Because if you buy from a small business, an actual person does a little happy dance.

AndAgain

Sustainable Newcomer Labels And Again

Since 2016 AndAgain creates one-of-a-kind fashion pieces from vintage & second-hand denim and leftover fabrics. The contemporary designs are all handmade in the US and waste absolutely no materials and almost no water in their production. Founders Morgan and Greg work closely with artists in Philadelphia and sewers all over the country.

Website: andagainco.com
Instagram: @andagainco

COSSAC

Sustainable Newcomer Labels Cossac

The Poland-born Agatka Kozak worked for high street labels and renowned designers at London Fashion Week when she witnessed destructive fast fashion practices she couldn’t continue to support. In 2014 she created the eco-hot slow fashion label Cossac in London. Her sustainably designed and ethically produced capsule collections (limited to reduce waste and deadstock!) aren’t seasonal, so you can wear them all year round. Her sassy pieces have been featured in Self Control Mag, Nylon or Glamour (Germany).

Website: cossac.co.uk
Instagram: studio_cossac

Rakha

sustainable newcomer labels rakha

Instead of following seasonal trends, Rakha offers re-defined classics, with a contemporary look. Balloon-shaped arms, transparent blouses and oversized shirts. – You can find real statement pieces here! Committed to reducing their environmental impact, Rakha’s products use GOTS-certified and biodegradable fabrics as well as Global Recycle Standard Certified (GRS) materials which make 50% of all clothes.

Website: rakha.co.uk
Instagram: @rakhaofficial

Rhumaa

sustainable newcomer labels rhumaa

For every collection RHUMAA partners with different artists who create original designs that are based on impactful stories they experienced. This way, RHUMAA supports them to raise awareness about social issues through fashion. We got very inspired! To top this off, for each item sold, RHUMAA donates a portion to projects, people and art. High-quality natural fabrics only – vegan styles available, too ?

Website: rhumaa.com
Instagram: @rhumaa_official

JUNGLE FOLK

sustainable newcomer labels jungle folk

Instead of helping people through donations, designer Pauline Treis from Munich wants to empower them. This is why she started her Switzerland-based brand Jungle Folk together with artisans from Columbia in 2013. By creating beautiful classics they are able to improve their skills and make a living. You can wear Jungle Folk’s casual, super simple and seasonless clothes made from sustainable materials (GOTS-certified organic cotton, linen, silk and more) on any occasion.

Website: junglefolk.com
Instagram: jungle_folk

Maska

sustainable newcomer labels maska

Maska means “knitted stitch” in Swedish. Inspired by her grandmother, Maria Svensson started her 1st collection with a range of sustainably made, hand-knitted cardigans. Now Maska offers quality garments including bold jerseys, minimalist dresses or stylish trousers using Italian wool, organic cotton, cashmere, and other natural fabrics.

Website: maska.se
Instagram: @maska.se

Atolye Ren

sustainable newcomer labels atolye ren

About a year ago, Gözde Karateki decided to live her dream and started Atolye Ren. Atölye means studio in Turkish and Ren means pure or clean in Norwegian. The sustainable fashion label from Istanbul upcycles discarded fabrics, reuses their own production waste and works with natural, biodegradable materials such as linen or Tencel. Believing that beauty lies in diversity, they produce minimal, comfortable and timeless clothes for different body shapes and all sizes.

Website: atolyeren.com
Instagram: @atolyeren

©2015-2022 MOCHNI - All Rights Reserved

Scroll To Top